admin_hns

August 28, 2016

8 Steps to Higher Performance

The following eight steps will help you and your employees interact in ways that make you work more efficiently and effectively. These steps will help you […]
August 28, 2016

10 signs of a dysfunctional workplace

10 signs of a dysfunctional workplace  Though there are many organisations today that can be vouched for as the perfect workplaces, there are still many more who simply don’t manage to make it to that list. Though the scenario on the outside might be ‘picture perfect’, in reality the case might not exactly be so. Most workplaces fail to be the ‘ideal’ place to be for various reasons – at times the management is not up to the mark or at times, it’s the employees who aren’t good enough. There can be many tell tale signs of what makes a workplace dysfunctional. If these signs are not comprehended at an early stage, it can spell doom for the organisation as well as the employees. Here are 10 signs of a dysfunctional workplace that every organisation should put its guard up against. 1. Communication or the lack of it  Communication, or the lack of it, is one of the earliest signs of a dysfunctional organisation. The symptoms are increased gossip, more water-cooler/coffee-machine groupings of employees, younger people looking for opportunities to get authentic information from their bosses, bosses in the ‘don’t quote me but’ mode, employees’ scepticism increasing and a sense of apathy when employees gather together and talk about the organisation. “Let’s face it; gossip by itself is harmless, unless it tends to get malicious and personal. The office grapevine is probably the best way most people hear about organisational news. If this media can be purposefully harnessed, then the flow of communication can be made very productive,” says Marcel Parker, chairman, Ikya Human Capital Solutions. 2. Nothing gets done without the boss’s approval  “Sure, the boss has the final say, but work should be delegated, with employees taking responsibility for tasks that do not require the boss’s personal time and attention. The organisation will be much more productive and empowered if the top boss doesn’t have to sign off on every little thing,” says Dr Naresh Malhan, MD, Manpower India. “Lack of delegation of authority can be a big impediment. In such organisations, the entire decision-making process is so democratic that most often there are more meetings after meetings but seldom any directions or decisions are taken,” adds Ajeet Chauhan, VP, HR & training, Nirula’s. 3. Continuous fire fighting  If a workplace is operating without any process in place, where the stress level is very high, nobody has time for anything, all are busy all the time, work-life balance is nil and there is no innovation happening, then it certainly qualifies to be a dysfunctional workplace,” expresses Anuradha HR, project head, Metis ERC India Pvt Ltd, adding, “A workplace needs to evolve work process, and a goal oriented culture to get rid of this.” Over-worked employees and avoidable pressures are also signs of a dysfunctional workplace. Such organisations run in constant crisis situation and fire fighting mode. This creates undue pressure on the work force and results in ‘burn outs’,” informs Chauhan. 4. Meetings without any agenda  “Meetings conducted without any agenda build employee frustration. The management should conduct meetings with defined agendas to ensure constructive input and productive output from its employees for such meetings, states Sandeep Soni, ED and CEO, Spanco BPO. 5. Perception management Vs Performance management  “People are judged by their proximity and perception than productivity or output. For example, if an employee is seen working late hours, he invariably becomes the ideal/good worker,” says Chauhan. According to Malhan, “In dysfunctional organisations, what matters is not what you’ve accomplished in a day, but how many hours you were seen ‘working’. We all know at least one person who hangs around until everyone else goes home or shows up at 7 in the morning just to make a good impression with the boss. Reward productivity, not time spent at the office. Adds Soni, “Senior management should evaluate the employee’s performance based on achievement of targets rather than how long employees are working at office.” 6. Lack of empowerment  Lack of empowerment is another sign of a dysfunctional organisation, particularly promoter driven organisations. As we all understand, empowerment is not the signing of financial instruments or purchasing goods/services up to a certain financial level, but taking responsibility for your decision without fear of failure and having the requisite tools to do so. Owning a decision without passing the buck to one’s boss or even ones junior is essential. “Organisations which have successfully overcome the mindset of operating in a blame-culture (wherein employees think somebody has to take the blame but not ME), have invited suggestions from the employees themselves as to what can be done about this. This has been the beginning of trust development, expresses Parker. 7. Lack of rewards/recognition/incentives  Such organisations don’t drive a rational action-reward system, which lowers the quality of performance and also leads to higher attrition in the company. “A company should constantly motivate its employees to improve performance by giving them various performance-based incentives, appreciation mails from top management and also acknowledging their achievements in their internal meetings/forums and magazines,” states Chauhan. Adds Soni, “Companies should create an extremely motivating work environment by rewarding and recognising top performers. This helps in encouraging and motivating the employees to perform better.” 8. No one ever gets fired, no matter how ineffective they are at their job  While employees need hope, they also need expectations and standards. “If doing a bad job doesn’t get a worker reprimanded or even fired, what’s the point of doing a good job,” questions Malhan. Similarly Soni adds that no action against inefficient/lazy employees is also a sign of a dysfunctional workplace. “Organisations should take corrective actions against employees who are lazy and recoil from hard work. Failure to take any corrective measures de-motivates even the efficient employees to continue performing well. It further provides leverage to employees who do not perform to continue underperforming without any fear of being reprimanded,” says he. 9. Corruption  Misuse of equipment, money, position, and power are the most evident signs of a workplace that is not going towards the right direction. “The signs of people working towards their own benefit by using the workplace is a warning for any workplace,” explains Anuradha HR. 10. Lack of values and mission  Some organisations have values and moralities which they only respect at the lower level but when it comes to serious issues, they easily surrender to it. This can cause conflict in the employee and confuse him ‘when to follow which value’. Every organisation should have clearly defined values and missions which have to be followed by all, from front line staff to top management,” adds Chauhan. In the day to day functioning of organisations, many a times signs that can cause major harm are ignored or not given much importance. But, eventually, these very signs can seep deeper into the system and hence cause bigger damage than imagined. Hence, every organisation should be alert and make sure that they keep such signs at bay and maintain a positive and healthy environment.
August 28, 2016

Are you killing your subordinates ?

Corporate Toxaemia- are you killing your subordinates ? Mid last year, Rajesh, an old friend who is a senior manager, got an offer from a BPO to head a 600 member process at its Gujarat operations. He was thrilled by the offer! He had heard a lot about the CEO of this company, a charismatic man often quoted in the business press for his visionary attitude. The salary was great. The company had all the right systems in place – employee-friendly human resources (HR) policies, the very best technology, a canteen that served superb food. In fact, even a huge cabin to himself! The client, too, was well known and a respected player in the telecom circle. “I could never ask for anything more in life!” he said soon after he joined. “It’s wonderful working with such an organisation!” Less than two months after he joined, Rajesh walked out of the job. He has no other offer in hand but he said he couldn’t take it anymore. Nor, apparently, could several other people in his department who have also quit recently. The CEO is distressed about the high employee turnover. He’s distressed about the money he’s spent in training them. He’s distressed because he can’t figure out what happened. Why did this talented employee leave despite a top salary? Rajesh quit for the same reason that drives many good people away. The answer lies in this surprising finding: If you’re losing good people, look to their immediate supervisor. More than any other single reason, he is the reason people stay and thrive in an organisation. “People leave managers – not companies”. So much money has been thrown at the challenge of keeping good people – in form of better pay, better perks and better training – when, in the end, turnover is mostly a manager issue. If you have a turnover problem, look first to your managers. Are they driving people away? Beyond a point, an employee’s primary need has less to do with money, and more to do with how he’s treated and how valued he feels. Much of this depends directly on the immediate manager. A survey conducted some years ago found that nearly 75 per cent of employees have suffered at the hands of difficult superiors. Of all the workplace stressors, a bad boss is possibly the worst, directly impacting the emotional health and productivity of employees. Here are some all-too common tales from the battlefield: Shyam, still shudders as he recalls the almost daily firings his boss subjected him to, usually in front of his subordinates. His boss emasculated him with personal, insulting remarks. In the face of such rage, Shyam completely lost the courage to speak up. But when he reached home depressed, he poured himself a few drinks, and became as abusive as the boss himself. Only, it would come out on his family and friends. Not only was his work life in the doldrums, his relationship began cracking up too. Another employee Ambar, recalls the Chinese torture his boss put him through after a minor disagreement. He cut him off completely. He bypassed him in any decision that needed to be taken. Says Ambar, “It was humiliating sitting at an empty table. I knew nothing and no one told me anything.” Unable to bear this corporate Siberia, he finally quit. HR experts say that of all the abuses, employees find public humiliation the most intolerable. The first time, an employee may not leave, but a thought has been planted. The second time that thought gets strengthened. The third time, he starts looking for another job. When people cannot retort openly in anger, they do so by passive aggression. By doing only what they are told to do and no more. Shyam says, “You don’t have your heart and soul in the job.” Different managers can stress out employees in different ways by being too controlling, too suspicious, too critical, and too nit-picky. When this goes on too long, an employee will quit – often over a seemingly trivial issue. It isn’t the 100th blow that knocks a good man down. It’s the 99 that went before. And while it’s true that people leave jobs for all kinds of reasons – for better opportunities or for circumstantial reasons, many who leave would have stayed – had it not been for that one man constantly condescending them. As Paresh’s boss did, “You are dispensable. I can find dozens like you.” While it seems like there are plenty of other fishes especially in today’s waters, consider for a moment the cost of losing a talented employee. Plus, of course, most importantly, the loss of the company’s reputation. Every person who leaves a corporation then becomes its ambassador, for better or for worse. In both cases, former employees have left to tell their tales. Much of a company’s value lies between the ears of its employees. If it’s bleeding talent, it’s bleeding value. Oh, by the way, Toxaemia is a medical condition in which your blood contains poison and can prove fatal. Corporate Toxaemia kills! Think about it…
August 28, 2016

EDP Manager required for a Sachin Based Unit – Vacancy ID: 2001

1. EDP Manager : Location : For a Sachin based Embroidery unit Experience : min 10 years IT experience Salary Range : 20 to 25 years Attributes Required […]