admin_hns

September 13, 2016

7 Keys to Unlock your team members Potential

7 Keys to Unlock your team members Potential Is it difficult to see the horizon because your gaze is fixed on the ground? Is morale and productivity down with your team? Do members have a complex issue regarding motivation with others? Leaders should never underestimate the power of a “thank you.”?? “Thank You” articulates each member’s contribution to the team & says each person matters. To open doors & release potential of each team member, try these different keys : Key #1: Reward People Differently. Just as performance differs between people, so should rewards. Reward behavior you want to see! A smile, a “thank you” or a well-deserved “Great Job!” go long way in motivating people.?? Key #2: Ignoring Doesn’t Make It Go Away. Dealing with a person that carries negativity around like a disease & tries to infect the workplace? Emotions are contagious & negativity can quickly spread. Don’t ignore it, address it – talk with team member & what you can do. Always remember first to understand, then to be understood. ?? Key #3: Be precise on What Warrants Rewards. Clarity motivates! Empowerment & freedom come from knowing what is to done & what will they get. Don’t keep rewards a secret & let them know the WIIFM (What’s In It For Me).?? Key #4: Be a Coach, Not a Critic. No one finds failing a rewarding. Walk along side team members – help them along. Team loyalty & mutual respect emerge from a collective effort. ?? Key #5: Build Up Publicly. Find people doing things right & let everyone know! You’ll be surprised how it motivates them! Conversely, never give negative publicity in public – it impacts atmosphere & all end up getting punished.?? Key #6: Be Fair. No one should ever feel like doing a good job on your team is like peeing in pants in a dark suit (it gives warm feeling but no one notices). Keep the balance of rewards in check with open communication and an atmosphere of collaboration. ?? Key #7: Have Fun ! Enjoying what you do is a reward that goes far beyond the bottom line. 85% of companies make sure employees have fun and enjoy what they do. Play a game, have a contest or just share funny stories. You will find that it will boost loyalty, retention, and productivity! Don’t be fooled, this takes time & effort to match the right key to the right door but it is worth the effort. When opened, you will not only have members having higher morale & productivity, you will also have one that knows that you care. As a leader, isn’t that the thanks we need??
September 13, 2016

Talk on Transaction analysis..

Talk on Transaction analysis Transaction analysis Parent ego state : it is formed of the unquestioned, unverified & un-edited recordings from external sources & consists of instructions, […]
September 13, 2016

Change the world ?

Change the world ? Husband & Wife A man feared his wife wasn’t hearing as well as she used to and he thought she might need […]
September 13, 2016

What kind of a team player are you ?

What kind of a team player are you ? Talent is valuable, yet individual brilliance rarely leads to success. As former American President Calvin Coolidge once said, “Unrewarded genius is almost a proverb”. We get little formal exposure to working in teams in school and college. Bschools do require some group work for projects, but their contribution to your grades remains marginal. Moreover, such groups are fairly homogenous, with everyone aligned towards the same goal – a high GPA. On the other hand, inter-departmental meetings are almost universally ridiculed for “being held too often, for far too long and too little value”.I often come across individuals who keep quiet in group meetings and then seek out the boss immediately after the meeting, to make their point. If asked why didn’t they speak up earlier, the rationale typically is “I didn’t want to hurt X…” or “I wanted to tell you in private…” Regardless of how the boss takes it, group members will conclude that such individuals have hidden agendas, or are sycophants, or both. Here are some common stereotypes, you’ll find in any group situation. Understand them well if you want to improve your effectiveness while working in a group…   DETRACTORS These people just can’t find anything right with the world. They criticise or complain about almost everything and everybody. We all know detractors, like the nit-picking aunt at a family wedding. A point to ponder is how often, or in what circumstances, do we become detractors. And, can we consciously pull ourselves up when we find we are slipping?   OBSERVERS They don’t speak up in a group situation. Observers may be passive, who are only physically present in the group, but mentally absent. Sometimes, observers may be active, keeping quiet, but conveying their engagement through their body language – eye contact and gestures like a smile, a nod or a frown.   PARTICIPANTS They actively participate in group’s tasks and plans. Unlike ACP (arbit class participation) and DCP (despo class participation) to get CP (class participation) marks at campus, the participant’s main objective here is to enhance self-learning. They achieve this by seeking examples and clarifying doubts. In a healthy group, most members would belong to this category.   CONTRIBUTORS The main difference between participants and contributors is that the latter also help others to learn and grow during the group’s activities. For instance, by assisting slow learners come upto speed or by explaining abstract concepts to others. Contributors gradually gain respect of the peer group. It almost follows that most contributors get regarded as high performers.   LEADERS […]